What Do Teachers Want from an Instructional Leader?

Alberta’s Principal Quality Standards have Providing Instructional Leadership as their fourth leadership dimension. The document describes this quality as follows:

The principal ensures that all students have ongoing access to quality teaching and learning opportunities to meet
the provincial goals of education.

As part of my discussions with teachers in Professional Growth Plan meetings this year, I am asking the question, “In my role as an instructional leader, what can I have permission to look for and discuss with you during and after my classroom visits?” Most teachers are caught off guard by this question, and are not sure how to answer. A few of them were able to come up with an answer on their own but some took a bit of discussion and gentle probing to decide on a focus. The interesting piece is that those who came up with an answer on their own, and those who needed some dialogue all settled on the same thing – student engagement.

The University of Alberta produced a document in 2011 entitled, Student Engagement: What do we know, and what should we do?
While the document states that engagement can be difficult to define, it does lay out what a classroom with student engagement will look like.

  1. Learning that is relevant, real, and intentionally interdisciplinary – at times moving learning from the classroom into the community.
  2. Technology-rich learning environments – not just computers, but all types of technology, including scientific equipment, multi-media resources, industrial technology, and diverse forms of portable communication technology (Project Tomorrow, 2010).
  3. Positive, challenging, and open – sometimes called “transparent” learning climates – that encourage risk-taking and guide learners to reach co- articulated high expectations. Students are involved in assessment for learning and of learning.
  4. Collaboration among respectful “peer-to-peer” type relationships between students and teachers (horizontal organization model); Professional Learning Communities working together to plan, research, develop, share, and implement new research, strategies, and materials.
  5. A culture of learning – teachers are learning with students. Language, activities and resources focus on learning and engagement first, and achievement second.

While the research into engagement seems to focus on older grades, there is application to the classrooms that hold our younger students (Prek – 4). What this means for me, is I have to do some investigation into how do I detect engagement when I am in classrooms. I would think it certainly doesn’t only look like quiet students, sitting at their desks working independently. We all know there are students who seem to be totally distracted, and may even seem preoccupied with another task who are soaking up everything being said and done around them. 

What I do most appreciate now, is the opportunity to have these discussions with teachers. As we learn together, and talk about what engagement looks like, we will be moving on a path to increase engagement and student achievement in our classrooms.

So, there’s lots I can do to make teachers feel valued (this is only a small sampling of things I can do as a leader):

  1. Respect them and their time
  2. Spend time fostering relationships
  3. Recognizing their professional judgement
  4. Trust them
  5. Communicate with them (especially LISTEN to them)

All of these combined with discussions around practice serve to move a school forward.

students-99506_1280Now I have to get learning about engagement!!!

 

D Propp

 

 

(Photo obtained from Pixabay)

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