Tagged: relationships

Reflecting On A Change

I knew I was ready for a change. I asked for a change.

Sometimes you get what you ask for!

Much of what I am doing at my new school is exactly what I was doing as principal at my previous school. Most of what I did, I’m just doing more of. That’s ok. What I didn’t anticipate was having to redo a lot of cultural things I did there. I didn’t reallyyoga-422196_640 think about having to get to know every student again. I didn’t think about the difficulties of dealing with parents who didn’t know me.

So, I’ve been at this for just over four months here. I work with a great staff. I’ve met a lot of great parents, and the majority of the kids are awesome. But, I am missing the comfort of my previous assignment. I miss knowing everyone; and knowing, pretty much, what to expect everyday. I have to remind myself – I asked for a change.

I knew I had learned what I could learn at my previous school. I knew everyone and everyone knew me. We knew what to expect of each other. We often knew what each other was thinking and how each person would react to a situation. But, that was becoming stagnant.

So, here I am. Every once in a while I have a day where I ask myself if I made the right choice. There are times when those days pile up on each other. Yesterday was one of those days. Today started out that way, but fortunately isn’t ending that way.
I just had a chat with a teacher who is feeling some frustration with one student in her class. We talked about all the great things that are happening. We talked about the growth the class has made and the improvement in the behaviours of a couple of very complex kids. As I was talking to her, I had to remind myself, that what I was saying applied to me too.

There are tough days and tough situations. They only become the focus when we allow them to.

Change is good. But we also need to make sure allow we ourselves time to adjust and time to begin the relearning process.
It will come. I can’t forget why I asked for a change.

I needed it.
Darryl Propp

What Do Teachers Want from an Instructional Leader?

Alberta’s Principal Quality Standards have Providing Instructional Leadership as their fourth leadership dimension. The document describes this quality as follows:

The principal ensures that all students have ongoing access to quality teaching and learning opportunities to meet
the provincial goals of education.

As part of my discussions with teachers in Professional Growth Plan meetings this year, I am asking the question, “In my role as an instructional leader, what can I have permission to look for and discuss with you during and after my classroom visits?” Most teachers are caught off guard by this question, and are not sure how to answer. A few of them were able to come up with an answer on their own but some took a bit of discussion and gentle probing to decide on a focus. The interesting piece is that those who came up with an answer on their own, and those who needed some dialogue all settled on the same thing – student engagement.

The University of Alberta produced a document in 2011 entitled, Student Engagement: What do we know, and what should we do?
While the document states that engagement can be difficult to define, it does lay out what a classroom with student engagement will look like.

  1. Learning that is relevant, real, and intentionally interdisciplinary – at times moving learning from the classroom into the community.
  2. Technology-rich learning environments – not just computers, but all types of technology, including scientific equipment, multi-media resources, industrial technology, and diverse forms of portable communication technology (Project Tomorrow, 2010).
  3. Positive, challenging, and open – sometimes called “transparent” learning climates – that encourage risk-taking and guide learners to reach co- articulated high expectations. Students are involved in assessment for learning and of learning.
  4. Collaboration among respectful “peer-to-peer” type relationships between students and teachers (horizontal organization model); Professional Learning Communities working together to plan, research, develop, share, and implement new research, strategies, and materials.
  5. A culture of learning – teachers are learning with students. Language, activities and resources focus on learning and engagement first, and achievement second.

While the research into engagement seems to focus on older grades, there is application to the classrooms that hold our younger students (Prek – 4). What this means for me, is I have to do some investigation into how do I detect engagement when I am in classrooms. I would think it certainly doesn’t only look like quiet students, sitting at their desks working independently. We all know there are students who seem to be totally distracted, and may even seem preoccupied with another task who are soaking up everything being said and done around them. 

What I do most appreciate now, is the opportunity to have these discussions with teachers. As we learn together, and talk about what engagement looks like, we will be moving on a path to increase engagement and student achievement in our classrooms.

So, there’s lots I can do to make teachers feel valued (this is only a small sampling of things I can do as a leader):

  1. Respect them and their time
  2. Spend time fostering relationships
  3. Recognizing their professional judgement
  4. Trust them
  5. Communicate with them (especially LISTEN to them)

All of these combined with discussions around practice serve to move a school forward.

students-99506_1280Now I have to get learning about engagement!!!

 

D Propp

 

 

(Photo obtained from Pixabay)

What? Me? Change?

I’ve been in my new school for a couple of weeks, but this is only the fourth day with students. So far things have gone very well. When I first started as an administrator, the most daunting task seemed to fall under the category of Managing School Operations and Resources. Over time, that challenge is probably the easiest to learn. One thing I have discovered is that skills learned in this area are relatively easy to transfer to a new site, and I assume this is especially true as I have moved within the same school division.10495080_849029898449644_968077191718025330_o

One area that I did not expect to be so different is that of school culture. The school I came from was great. I enjoyed working there and miss being there. I am learning how my new school works and the beliefs and attitudes that makes it tick. The culture is reflected in the way students are treated and the way the staff embraces change and challenges.

There is no right answer as to what the ‘right’ culture is. A different culture can just be another way of approaching the same issue. We expect our students to find multiple ways of attacking problems and there is no reason not to expect our schools to do the same. I am enjoying working with a group of people who have a slightly different take on things. The task for me is to discern how that culture works and how to work with it to move the school forward as a place that has and continues to be the best place for students.

I just came across a quote on Twitter this morning, “Change is the opportunity to do something great!” (another quote from George Couros that I will repeat endlessly to the dismay of my staff). This time the change is something I am experiencing. It’s not a change because of something wrong, it’s a change because of something new. I think that’s the best kind of change!

Change is always an opportunity – and what a wonderful opportunity this is to do great things!

Bring it on!!!

D Propp

Another Year Older and… wiser?

I never cease to wonder at the speed by which a school year flies by! There is now less than two weeks left and so much left to do!!! How will I get everything done I need to? Seems to me like the perfect opportunity to write a blog.

I have, once again, used my blog as my professional growth plan. To me, it is the perfect combination of reflective tool and evidence tracker. I can use it to document my thoughts, clarify my ideas, garner feedback from colleagues, and set goals for myself. I will be definitely following the same format next year.

As I am moving to another school, I will have to rethink my goals. I have an idea of what I would like to actively pursue as my main goals, but I am looking forward to the context of a new school, and how my personal style will fit in with a whole new context. I can with some certainty say that, “Fostering Effective Relationships” will be a main area of focus. I know that I can’t expect to have much of an impact without taking the time to establish those relationships as a primary goal.

As it is a much bigger school, the standard of “Managing School Operations and Resources” will be an interesting learning opportunity as well. Is it the same as I have been doing at my current school, just on a bigger scale? Are there factors I am not aware of that make the structure that much more complex? Time will tell.

I have learned a lot this year. This summer I will be traveling to Australia for a holiday and to spend some time in a school there. THAT will be a learning experience. I know I will learn a lot there as well.

Have a great summer everyone, and I will see you early in September!!

D Propp

(and just to finish off the year – a photo I took on the weekend)10380226_10152095601431791_336462481745689895_o

It’s NOT What You Do That Makes You Effective.

Photo by Steven Geyer. From Flickr Creative Commons  (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/legalcode)

Photo by Steven Geyer. From Flickr Creative Commons (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-nd/2.0/legalcode)

This has been a very interesting week. I found out on Monday, that after six years, I am being transferred to a principalship in another school.

I am ready.

.

.

.

But, DARN IT, I am going to miss my current school – great staff, great parents and amazing kids.  Almost everything I am as a leader I owe to that place. I did feel ready to take on a leadership role when I first started as Vice Principal at Bon Accord Community School in 2008. Even though I thought I was ready, I have learned a LOT. One of the most important things that became clear to me was that one of the most important roles of a leader is not what you do for people, but how you make them feel. That learning, to me has made all the difference.

A leader has to get things done, the school has to move forward. Learning has to happen. Resources have to be acquired and allocated. There are tasks that range from the mundane to the very vital. There are the myriad of meetings. There are even occasions where we get to be responsible for cleaning up someone’s mess. Our job is full of “THINGS”.

Since Tuesday, when the move was announced, I’ve received numerous phone calls, emails, posts on our school FaceBook page and have talked personally with a number of parents. Most have offered congratulations  and have expressed disappointment in my move to another school. I even received one very angry email from a parent. (not sure yet how to respond to that one).  I know I am not even close to a having ‘arrived’ as a leader. I still have a long way to go and a lot to learn. But I know that keeping this in mind, has made my time at Bon Accord, to some degree, successful.

We can’t always make everyone happy. Very few decisions can satisfy everyone. However, we can work to establish a culture of caring, trust and respect, that makes everyone feel valued. In a welcoming environment and an aim of touching the spirits of the people we work with and for, we will be able to move things forward much easier. People respond to that kind of approach. They buy in. They remember.

D Propp

Lessons from Road Rage

So, I’m a very calm person. Very few people have seen me angry – ever. I had an incident recently, that when I shared with people was generally met with disbelief. The way I reacted taught me quite a bit about not just myself, but how people in general deal with stressful situations. The most important lesson is how I need to seek to understand others.

It started when I had to deal with a number of ‘poor choices’ other drivers were making. I generally just shake my head or mutter under my breath, but always try to keep in mind that people are people, and I have no idea what they are dealing with. However, one incident that day really sent me over the edge. I was in a parking lot in front of a box store, and I saw a couple of very young boys about to cross from the sidewalk in front of the stores into the parking lot. I stopped, not too suddenly; but the young woman behind me started honking. Well, I couldn’t believe that she either couldn’t see the kids, or wouldn’t stop to think for 2 seconds about why I might be stopping. My patience for her dissipated immediately and I am embarrassed to admit that, to put it bluntly, gave her the finger.
After the kids crossed in front of me, I kept driving, but was very upset with her lack of patience. As we continued through the parking lot, she remained behind me. When I pulled up to the stop sign to pull out onto the street, I looked in my mirror and she was checking her cell phone – All patience was gone!

I put my emergency brake on and jumped out of my car to give her a piece of my mind. I was angry and she needed to know what I thought of her. Well, to my disbelief, she wouldn’t roll her window down so I could tell her. I finally just signaled to her to not use her cell phone, and stormed back to my car and drove off.

photo by Bobby Hidy, via Flickr Creative Commons

photo by Bobby Hidy, via Flickr Creative Commons

It took me about a minute to start feeling really stupid about what I had done. Once I had totally settled down I started thinking about the poor example I had been to my two sons who were in the car with me. I talked to them about it, and put up a public apology in FaceBook, as I had no way of apologizing to the young woman.

As I think back on the incident, I am reminded of the times I have to deal with angry students or parents. My first reaction is usually to try to reason with them. And being a generally long-suffering person, I find it difficult to empathize with people in that state. My own reaction to this incident has given me a bit of a view of what others go through. When someone is upset, they need time to calm down before they can be reasoned with. I need to be patient during that time.

As leaders in schools we really need to model patience and understanding, a trait which I think I usually do very well. Obviously, though I’m not totally there yet, and am continually learning. It’s great that we can all learn from our own mistakes.

Darryl Propp